FOXY seeks a Digital Storytelling Facilitator for our 2016 Peer Leader Retreats!

DEADLINE FOR APPLICANTS: FEBRUARY 29th, 2016 FOXY (Fostering Open eXpression among Youth) is an arts-based sexual/mental health and leadership organization with an office located in Yellowknife. We offer programming for Northern and Indigenous young women (and soon, young men!) across the Canadian North. Our focus is on the process of learning through the arts, rather … Read more

FOXY awarded the 2014 Arctic Inspiration Prize!

We are thrilled to announce that FOXY (Fostering Open eXpression among Youth) has been named the 2014 Laureate of the Arctic Inspiration Prize. The Arctic Inspiration Prize is a $1 million dollar prize awarded annually to groups contributing to the collection of Arctic knowledge, and are committed to the implementation of their knowledge into real-world application for the benefit of the people of the Canadian Arctic.

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Can’t get enough of Fort Smith!

FOXY decided we just weren’t finished with Fort Smith yet. We were back again for the third time around. We just can’t get enough of it! We had the pleasure to meet three different groups of girls over the course of three days, and even had a few returning Foxes come around for a second go at our workshops!

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FOXY does Fort Smith… again!

After all that northward travel, FOXY decided to change things up a bit, and hit one of the more southern (northern) communities. Going almost all the way to Alberta, the FOXY team found themselves in a small community of about 2500 people called Fort Smith.

The funny thing about the north is that when you’ve grown up in it or have come to call it home, it’s hard to go somewhere where there aren’t ties of some sort. Fort Smith just so happens to be the hometown of Candice Lys, who is the fantastic FOXY Project Lead.

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Tuktoyaktuk, Yo!

After our second workshop in Inuvik, we headed straight out the ice road into the Arctic Circle, to Tukoyaktuk. The drive was gorgeous and we literally watched as the trees on the land got smaller and smaller, eventually disappearing altogether.

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